Link

I give Zoe about 2 cups of chicken per day–1 cup in the am and 1 cup in the pm with veggies (I use about a cup of green beans, sweet potatoes–both of those cooked PLUS beets and carrots chopped up raw–all mixed together to make 1 cup, so I give her 2 cups of food total twice a day). I pour about 1/3-1/2 cup of chicken stock over the mixture and mix it all up, otherwise she wouldn’t eat all the veggies. (I do heat the stock up in the microwave before I pour it over the food, just to bring out the flavor). I also add about a tablespoon each of cottage cheese sour cream to help curb any yeast infections.

In addition to that I give her 2 egg yolks twice a day. Since the disease is a deficiency of amino acids and amino acids are the building blocks of protein, I do try to supplement the amount of protein. (She eats 4 egg yolks a day raw 2 in the am and 2 in the pm–separate from her meal and I cook about 1 egg white in the chicken stock with each yolk). This is how I prepare them:

I pour about 1/3-1/2 cup of chicken stock in a cup, then separate the egg yolks out in a bowl and put the whites in the cup with the stock and microwave it for about 1 minute 45 seconds to cook the egg whites. (Raw egg whites contain a protein called avidin, which can deplete biotin, one of the B vitamins. Biotin is need for dog’s growth, skin and coat health. The lack of it can cause hair loss, weakness, or skeleton deformity.).

Zoe gets the cooked egg white, stock mixture poured over the yolks and she LOVES it!

(hank the weim gets the other cooked egg white)

She gets a total of 4 Procell capsules a day (I give those separate from her meal–2 in the am and 2 in the pm)
Procell

The Omega 3’s that I give are the free form snip tips.
Free Form Snip Tips

These are all the things I can think of to share with you about our regime with Zoe.
She weighs about 57 lbs, so you’ll need to adjust accordingly!

19 thoughts on “What Zoe gets: food and supplements

  1. Jamiegoff Post author

    No, since Zoe is now diabetic, I have to limit the amounts of the beets and carrots I give her. I use beets, carrots, sweet potatoes and green beans to make up a total 1 cup of veggies and I combine that with 1 cup of chicken (for a total of 2 cups for a meal). She weighs around 57 lbs and her weight has been stable of the approx 2 cups twice a day of this diet (plus she gets the poly-vi-sol with iron to supplement as well as Missing Link Hip Joint and Coat)

    Zoe gets more sweet potatoes and green beans as they have a lower glycemic index than carrots and beets

    Does your dog have HS?

    Reply
  2. Kristin Brown

    I don’t know yet. She has the lip lesions and foot lesions. She is 9 and has had epilepsy since she was 1. She is on, KBr Phenobarb (weaning off now) and Keppra. Her bile acid test was normal and ultrasound was normal. They want her off the phenobarb for 2 weeks, then if it doesn’t get better, they want to do a skin biopsy to confirm diagnosis. I just got off the phone with my vet and she doesn’t want me to do this. I am heartbroken. Don’t know what to do.

    Reply
    1. Jamiegoff Post author

      You are welcome to call me 205-296-2323. It certainly sounds like its hepatocutaneous syndrome

      Reply
    2. Kristin Brown

      Just a follow up on Lilybelle, she is 100% better. Been about 5 months of trying to figure out what works for her, but we finally have it dialed in, she is on this diet and amino supplements and I have seen a remarkable turn around. You have been such a blessing to us. Thank you.

      Reply
  3. Marcus

    My dog was diagnosed with hepatocutaneous syndrome in March 2010 and was so bad she was given no more than six weeks to live. I was devastated but refused to allow them to euthanize her. I researched intensly and to cut it short, I used a combination of Antibiotics and Diet similar to what you describe with some Zinc supps etc. My baby survived and almost went into full remission within six weeks of starting antibiotics. She lasted until the 17th of January 2013, nearly 3 years after being written off by the vet and specialist. If this helps, I used human Antibiotics rather than animal as its a lot cheaper and you will need them for the rest of pets life. My dog was a 5kg (12lb) poodle cross. We started with Amoxycillin 250mg/5ml giving 2ml twice daily and combined with Flagyl 200mg/5ml giving 1.25ml twice daily. The Amoxycillin to fight the infections caused by the disease and the flagyl to help her stomach. After about three months we swithched the Amoxycillin to Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Brand which worked well was Curam Duo Syrup 400+57mg/5ml giving 1.25ml twice daily and keeping up the Flagyl. If I did not do the Antibiotic treatment she would not have survived as long. My dog hated Egg yolk, sardines, and anything with Omega 3 and 6 etc, all the stuff that would have helped and may have prevented her from getting it in the first place. Also keep your dog cool ie winter is kinder than summer with this disease. My Dog deteriated rapidly in our Australian Heat.
    I wish you the best.

    Reply
    1. Jamiegoff Post author

      Hi Marcus!
      Thanks so much for the comment! It’s great to hear of a positive outcome with this disease. My whole goal with Zoe is/was to give her at least a year of great quality of life. She has been in remission since January, though her symptoms started a year ago next month. She cannot take Flagyl, as it lowers the seizure threshold and that is the culprit of this whole thing: phenobarbital which was given to control her seizures.

      There is an article from Veterinary Dermatology, 2002, 13, 177-186 that on page 182 it states 20% of the dogs in this study were maintained for over 12 months. …”Most of these dogs were receiving hyperalimentation with protein supplements and intravenous amino acid infusions”. This is from a study of 36 dogs diagnosed with this awful disease and I believe the key component is the nutritional aspect. Zoe cannot receive the IV amino acids any more due to her veins, so we only support her nutritionally and I suspect that the chicken stock delivers the amino acids to her in a way that her body can absorb them, thus the reason for the lesions resolving and then returning based on just making “good stock”. I am sure there are other ways of delivering quality protein and amino acids by mouth through diet.

      I, like you, realized I could not take the “death sentence” without copious research on this disease. I spent many a night crying over ALL the sad stories of dogs diagnosed and subsequently being euthanized. I know not all owners want to go the the great lengths to keep their companions alive, but it has been our privilege to do so for her, especially when she can have such a great end of life story and perhaps help others along the way.

      Thanks again for your post! It’s nice to hear that though she’s not with you any longer you were able to give her the last 3 years that she wouldn’t have had otherwise!

      Jamie

      Reply
      1. Jamiegoff Post author

        Hi again,
        Forgot to say one thing: Zoe cannot take flagyl, but I treat her with probiotics to treat clostridium difficile from antibiotics. (I copied the below from Wikipedia). My vet uses Proviable-KP, but there are plenty of probiotics to use, just need live microorganisms to replace the ones killed with the antibiotics.

        Clostridium difficile (pronunciation below) (from the Greek kloster (κλωστήρ), ‘spindle’,[citation needed] and Latin difficile, ‘difficult, obstinate’),[1] also known as “CDF/cdf”, or “C. diff”, is a species of Gram-positive bacteria of the genus Clostridium that causes severe diarrhea and other intestinal disease when competing bacteria in the gut flora have been wiped out by antibiotics.

        Reply
  4. Lisa

    Our dog (10 year old Portugese Water Dog), Remy, was just diagnosed. We are heartbroken, she has struggled with liver disease but successfully for the last 2 years. She is lethargic and so not herself. Hoping to do the amino acid intravenous treatment but there seems to be a shortage. Just started egg yolks and zinc supplements yesterday. I will be off to search out chicken feet tomorrow and am going to try Zoe’s diet! So great to find ONE positive out come and it makes sense to me so game to try it….will keep you posted. One question though, on her diet menu you said 2 cups of food per day but if there is a cup of chicken in the a.m. then a cup of chicken with a cup of veggies and stock in the p.m. isn’t that 3 cups of food total or have I misunderstood? Let me know when you can…hope Zoe is still doing well!

    Reply
    1. Jamiegoff Post author

      Thanks for your post! I’m SO sorry to hear about Remy!! I give Zoe 2 cups of food in the am and 2 cups of food in the pm. Feel free to call me to talk! 205-296-2323. Jamie

      Reply
  5. Lisa

    Lisa, I have found the best place to get chicken feet is at a hispanic market. It by far makes the best stock. I am sorry for the diagnosis of your pup, my Dagwood is going for an infusion Wednesday. This will be his third but he has made it six weeks. I am trying to figure out though because he has no appetite and it is WORK getting him to eat. Any ideas? He will gobble up meet, but not his eggs.

    Reply
    1. Jamiegoff Post author

      Erin, if you search “appetite” on the blog, there is a post under “…worst labs yet” that I talked about a med that Zoe was given to assist with her appetite from Auburn: Mirtazapine 7.5 mg–she took a couple doses of it and it really did help! It is a prescription medication, so your vet would need to prescribe it. I believe it’s used for dogs with cancer to help with their appetite, also. Zoe lived off of chicken and Ezekiel bread and stock for about 2 weeks because she wouldn’t eat anything else. Anything that she would eat at that point, was better than the alternative!

      Reply
  6. Kim

    Hello, my dog Jess has just been diagnosed with Hepatocutaneous syndrome 6 weeks ago. She is an 12 year old Labrador German shepherd cross. She will be 13 on 30th November. We live in Tonbridge Kent England.
    I am so pleased to find your blog today, as the food my vet has recommended Hills prescription ZD, she will not eat either dry or tinned, so I have been cooking fresh food high in protein.

    I have tried White fish, chicken, turkey, eggs, minced beef or lamb on their own, or along with various combinations of the following sweet & white potatoes, green beans & broccoli or even all of the vegetables. Some days she will love her food others I will give her the same thing and she will just turn away. Over the weekend she seems happy to eat beef mince with all the vegetables in.

    Jess has also been prescribed various tablets
    Samylin for her liver
    Antibiotics; Therios
    Destolit and Tramadol. she is also taking Synoquin for arthritis.
    Plus Hibiscrub and Fuciderm gel for her paws.
    Her paws had started to clear up after first being diagnosed and having biopsies taken, but over the last week have flared up again.
    I just need to find the right food she is happy to eat that will help her paws heal too.
    She is very keen to go for short walks with shoes on but comes home and wants to lick her paws.
    I will try chicken stock today, plus would appreciate any advice you can give me.

    Reply
    1. Jamiegoff Post author

      Hi Kim, I’m so sorry to her about Jess! HS is a very frustrating disease!! Zoe wouldn’t eat either soon after being diagnosed. The veterinary school gave her an appetite stimulant Mirtazapine 7.5 mg — 1/2 tab to help stimulate her appetite (she weighs about 57 pounds)

      I also used sour cream and cottage cheese (which Zoe seemed to really like!–and still does!)

      Reply
    2. Jamiegoff Post author

      Hi Kim,

      Just checking to see how you and Jess are doing? I had sent you an email, but didn’t hear back, so just wanted to check on you!

      Reply
  7. Brenda sauvageau

    jamie, you have given me hope that my Libby will survive more than a few weeks. we have her on antibiotics to stop the raging infections in her feet and I know I cannot cure this disease, but i am going to do eveyrthing I can to help her. Ive cried for two days, Now I am going to man-up and fight.

    Reply
    1. Jamiegoff Post author

      Brenda, I’m so sorry to hear about Libby!! Feel free to email me at jamie@jamiegoff.com! Amino acid supplements and high amino acid diet have helped us with Zoe and I don’t know if they will work for you, but it is CERTAINLY worth the effort to try! Did they give her an amino acid IV infusion?

      Reply
  8. Lisa S.

    Hi
    So we’re currently testing but the doctor thinks Stella, my 5yr old Yorker might have hepatocutaneous. Her rear end is covered in lesions and the skin cells are dying. I was wondering what type of supplements you thought I could try and if there’s another option for the chicken stock. I read about biocell collage and I myself consume liquid amino acids. Do you think these could help? She’s only 5.5lbs and it’s so painful for her to use the bathroom.

    Reply
    1. Jamiegoff Post author

      Hi Lisa, I’m so very sorry you are here! On the main page of the blog is the link for “how do I start???” I listed the supplements there. Also, we tried “processed collagen” but it didn’t make a difference without chicken stock. Because your baby is so very small, I would start with a 1/2 -1 tsp of stock at least 4-5 times a day…..frequency is VERY important! Work up to 2 teaspoons (about 10 cc) 4-5 times a day. Go slowly, or they can get diarrhea. Also, Zoe REQUIRED Omega fatty acids….we used Bayer’s version called Snip-Tips, they come in small dog and medium/large…..of course, use the small dog one….we gave doubled the recommended amount with no side effects, but when I accidentally ran out, her lesions came back!! Feel free to call me to discuss!n diet is VERY important!! My cell is 205.296.2323
      Praying for you and Stella! (I love that her name means Star!!!) ;))

      Reply

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